Press quotes

  • The Christian Science Monitor, 24 August 2011

    "Americans may feel rightful anger in Europeans not doing their share," says Tomas Valasek, a defence and security specialist with the Centre for European Reform in London. "But Europe showed a newfound political courage in Libya. The commentariat, and the Atlanticists in Washington, who used to be NATO defenders, have missed the main story in Libya." ..."What worries me is that the NATO-bashing and anger at Europe in Washington, combined with a new generation in the US, will actually hasten the end of the alliance," says Mr Valasek.

  • Reuters, 24 August 2011

    Germans feel poorer and more troubled in their own economy it will make them less generous in providing aid, in making full use of the EFSF, in considering things like euro bonds. They will have more worries, be more insecure," said Charles Grant, director of the Centre for European Reform in London.

  • Bloomberg, 22 August 2011

    "For much of the history of the European Union, the alliance between Germany and France was the main motor for integration," Katinka Barysch, deputy director of the London-based Centre for European Reform, said in a

    The Guardian, 22 August 2011

    Philip White, of the London-based Centre for European Reform, explains that EU leaders are torn between meeting the demands of the markets and upholding democratic norms: "The stage we are at in the eurozone crisis presents politicians with a deeply uncomfortable position: trying to convince markets that they are taking the necessary action to place economies on a more sustainable path and that the euro is here to stay while on the other hand to persuade their electorates that they are respecting democratic traditions." "If you look at the debt and deficit numbe

  • Financial Times, 21 August 2011

    "The euro crisis has left many people in the richer EU countries opposed to any kind of transfers to poorer countries," writes Stephen Tindale, an associate fellow at the Centre for European Reform, in a recent review of the budget. In the minds of many Europeans, Mr Tindale argues, development funds to help poorer regions and national economic bail-outs had become one and the same.

  • The New York Times, 17 August 2011

    Simon Tilford, chief economist at the Centre for European Reform (CER) in London, called it "a positive step that this debate is taking place in Germany and that there is an acceptance that pooling fiscal authority is a necessary precondition of a lasting conclusion of the crisis." "But there is a risk," he added pointedly, “that in order to sell this to domestic opinion, Germany will extract concessions that will render the whole thing unworkable." ...Europe still hasn’t resolved the fundamental question it skirted back in 1996 at Dublin Castle: Is the euro mor

  • The Wall Street Journal, 16 August 2011

    "It's good news that we're seeing this discussion in Germany, because the eurozone can't continue to muddle through now that we're seeing contagion to the core," says Simon Tilford, chief economist at the Centre for European Reform, a London think-tank.

  • The Wall Street Journal, 16 August 2011

    "It's imperfect [the eurobond] and it would be difficult," says Simon Tilford of the Centre for European Reform, a London think tank. "But it's much less destructive, economically and politically," than watching the euro collapse, he says.

  • Bloomberg, 12 August 2011

    "No single currency has ever survived without some form of debt mutualisation," said Simon Tilford, chief economist at the London-based Centre for European Reform, a research institute focused on European integration. "There's an increasing recognition that that is the only way of stabilising the eurozone."

  • The Scotsman, 12 August 2011

    "Sanctions on the energy sector would be an obvious next step," Clara O'Donnell, of the Centre for European Reform, said. "But if there were a real interest to do that, it would probably have gone further already - the level of violence the Syrian authorities have been inflicting has been quite prolonged now and it's striking to see how slow the exploration of widening sanctions has been. Clearly, the desire of European policy makers not to damage the economic interests of some firm may be a playing a role."