• Opinion piece by Stephen Tindale
    Fabian Society, 11 July 2014

    Air pollution kills 29,000 people every year in the UK, according to Public Health England. So clean air ought to be a political priority.

  • Opinion piece by Stephen Tindale
    Le Temps, 14 May 2014

    Stephen Tindale, membre du Centre for European Reform basé à Londres, un think tank pro-européen mais critique, donne des pistes pour redonner du souffle au projet européen, miné par la crise et la perte de confiance

  • Opinion piece by Stephen Tindale
    The Economist Intelligence Unit, 14 May 2014

    All clean energy sources are needed to limit global warming, argues Stephen Tindale, associate fellow at the Centre for European Reform.

  • Opinion piece by Stephen Tindale
    Environmental Health News, 07 May 2014

    Polls predicts fervently anti-EU parties, such as the UK Independence Party, will make significant inroads in this month's European elections. And if David Cameron wins the next general election, he has pledged to hold an in/out referendum on the EU. However Stephen Tindale, associate fellow at the Centre for European Reform, argues indepdence would put at risk all the environmental and health benefits that flow from EU membership.

  • Policy brief by Stephen Tindale, 30 April 2014

    European rules have delivered cleaner air and water in Britain, and protected wildlife. Outside the EU, Britain would again be 'the dirty man of Europe'.

  • Insight by Stephen Tindale, 10 April 2014

    Europe should improve energy efficiency, develop all alternative gas sources, and expand renewable, CCS and nuclear energy. The foreign policy advantages would justify the cost.

  • Opinion piece by Stephen Tindale
    Ecologist, 08 April 2014

    The UK should continue to use nuclear power, in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, writes Stephen Tindale. It should also test new nuclear technologies that can burn plutonium, such as the PRISM reactor, and develop molten salt reactors.

  • Opinion piece by Stephen Tindale
    Fabian Society, 03 April 2014

    The smog in much of the UK at present is not as visible as the infamous 1950s smogs, and may not be quite as dangerous. But it is not safe. The 50s smogs were vanquished by a Conservative government banning coal burning in homes and moving coal power stations away from towns and cities. But the relentless growth in road transport has brought dirty air back into British life.