Britain & other member-states

Choices for Europe

Choices for Europe

Nathaniel Copsey, Carolyn Moore, Clara Marina O'Donnell
01 May 2009
CER - University of Birmingham
Sluggish economic growth, high unemployment, ageing populations, climate change and security challenges on the borders of Europe have been some of the top priorities on the European agenda since the early 1990s. The EU has tried to tackle these issues, notably through its commitments to reduce greenhouse gases and its Lisbon strategy for economic growth.
Germany: Between a rock and a hard place

Germany: Between a rock and a hard place

19 February 2009
Twelve months ago it seemed inconceivable that any member of the EU could face a sovereign debt crisis. It would have been the stuff of fantasy to argue that Ireland or Austria could be among those at risk.
Britain's Schengen dilemma

Britain's Schengen dilemma

10 February 2009
Britain supports more EU co-operation against terrorism, crime and illegal immigration and has done so for over a decade. This is because effective justice co-operation has clearly been in the national interest (as with the speedy capture and extradition of one of the 2005 London bombers from Italy to Britain).
The French, the European Commission and the Tories

The French, the European Commission and the Tories

29 January 2009
One Frenchman, Jean Monnet, invented the European Commission, and another, Jacques Delors, was its greatest president. Yet the French are increasingly hostile to this Brussels institution.
Why is Britain eurosceptic?

Why is Britain eurosceptic?

19 December 2008
The British are more hostile to the EU than any other European people. But why? Charles Grant looks at the role of geography, history and economics in nurturing euroscepticism.
The Irish send out good vibrations on Lisbon

The Irish send out good vibrations on Lisbon

08 December 2008
Ireland’s parliament – the Oireachtas – recently published a lengthy report on where the country’s relationship with the EU stands after the country’s rejection of the Lisbon treaty by referendum.
Irish government

How a new Irish government might save Lisbon

24 October 2008
The financial crisis is challenging many of our assumptions about the course of politics and world affairs. Gordon Brown – only weeks ago portrayed as nearing the end of his time as UK prime minister – has been elevated to European, even global leadership status.
In defence of Anglo-Saxon capitalism

In defence of Anglo-Saxon capitalism

29 September 2008
Those who never liked ‘Anglo-Saxon’ capitalism are feeling smug. Marxists, fans of ‘Rhineland’ capitalism and those who simply cannot stand American power are crowing.
The CER guide to the French presidency

The CER guide to the French presidency

Charles Grant, Clara Marina O'Donnell, Hugo Brady, Katinka Barysch, Philip Whyte, Simon Tilford, Tomas Valasek
04 July 2008
France's EU presidency was always going to be ambitious, with wideranging plans for climate change, immigration and defence. Now, however, France will have to focus on resolving the legal and institutional mess created by the Irish No to the EU's Lisbon treaty. President Nicolas Sarkozy will struggle to save the...
Tough choices to avoid euro-paralysis

Tough choices to avoid euro-paralysis

19 June 2008
The Irish did the wrong thing for the right reasons in their referendum on the Lisbon treaty. Voters rejected an international treaty, the benefits of which did not seem to merit a change to the country's constitution.
Will the Irish guillotine Lisbon?

Will the Irish guillotine Lisbon?

Hugo Brady
04 June 2008
On 12 June 2008 Ireland will hold the EU's only referendum on the Lisbon Treaty. With the campaign entering its decisive phase, polls indicate that the vote could be dramatically close with turnout determining the result.
Bad omens loom over Irish referendum

Bad omens loom over Irish referendum

01 February 2008
Ireland's voters have a crucial decision to make on the future of the EU – in May or June this year – when they vote in the only referendum on the Treaty of Lisbon.
Poland’s bold new foreign policy

Poland’s bold new foreign policy

01 February 2008
For the rest of Europe, the worst thing about Poland’s Law and Justice government, led by Jaroslaw Kaczynski, was its foreign policy. His approach towards Russia, Germany and (sometimes) the EU – supported by his twin brother, President Lech Kaczynski – was confrontational.
Poland

Poland's bold new foreign policy

17 January 2008
As far as the rest of Europe was concerned, the worst thing about Poland’s Law and Justice government, led by Jaroslaw Kaczynski (and supported by his twin brother, President Lech Kaczynski), was its foreign policy. The twins’ attitude towards Russia, Germany and – sometimes – the EU was confrontational. The Civic Platform government that took over in October is shifting Poland’s foreign policy. Its ministers often speak to the Germans without reminding them of the war. More controversially, the government is trying to build bridges with Russia. Moscow has lifted its ban on meat exports from Poland, while Warsaw has consulted the Russians about the Bush administration’s plans to deploy missile defence systems in Poland. Prime Minister Donald Tusk is much less enthusiastic than the Kaczynskis about missile defence
Politics, Sarkozy and the euro

Politics, Sarkozy and the euro

Philip Whyte
03 December 2007
Not long after its launch, the euro was famously dismissed by a disgruntled currency trader as a “toilet currency”. How things have changed. Since 2003, the euro’s external value has soared, particularly against the US dollar.
Bulletin issue 57

Issue 57 - 2008

Charles Grant, Philip Whyte
30 November 2007
France

Sarkonomics – a user’s guide

Philip Whyte
08 November 2007
President Sarkozy is frequently portrayed in France and elsewhere as an “economic liberal”. This is a mistake. He is undoubtedly an economic reformer prepared to take on the privileges of labour market “insiders”; but he retains a French dirigiste’s belief in an active role for the state in economic development. This manifests itself in several areas, including his support for “national champions”, his mercantilist vision of international trade, and his belief that governments should have greater influence over the European Central Bank (ECB).
Yes to a referendum, but not on this treaty

Yes to a referendum, but not on this treaty

01 October 2007
Britain is divided over the EU’s new Reform Treaty. The eurosceptic lobby is ratcheting up a well-funded, media-savvy campaign to pressure the government into holding a referendum on the treaty.