Single market, competition & trade

Has Germany become Europe's locomotive? thumbnail

Has Germany become Europe's locomotive?

Philip Whyte
02 September 2010
The German economy has been growing exceptionally strongly of late. In the second quarter of 2010, it expanded faster than any other economy in the G7 and faster than at any time since the country’s reunification in 1990.
Euro

A childish take on the eurozone crisis

Philip Whyte
02 August 2010
In the 1970's, a group of young professionals in Washington formed a baby-sitting co-operative. The way it worked was simple. Couples who wanted an evening out could call on other parents to look after their children.
Germany, the euro and the politics of the bail-out

Germany, the euro and the politics of the bail-out

Katinka Barysch
28 June 2010
Germany agreed to support its eurozone partners only slowly and reluctantly. Domestic political constraints and Angela Merkel's caution were partly to blame.
The eurozone retreats into a beggar-thy-neighbour cul-de-sac

The eurozone retreats into a beggar-thy-neighbour cul-de-sac

14 June 2010
Almost every member of the eurozone is rushing to slash public spending. While there is no doubting the scale of the fiscal challenge, the eurozone economy is not strong enough to cope with the contractionary effects of a generalised budgetary tightening.
Eurozone governance: Why the Commission is right thumbnail

Eurozone governance: Why the Commission is right

Philip Whyte
04 June 2010
The collapse of market confidence sparked by the parlous state of Greece’s public finances is forcing the EU to review how the eurozone is run. This is entirely welcome.
The euro's reality gap

The euro's reality gap

01 June 2010
Europe faces a critical choice between greater integration or disintegration. The gap between the rhetoric of a united Europe and the reality of national interests and politics has always dogged the EU.
Business leaders risk discrediting markets

Business leaders risk discrediting markets

13 May 2010
Despite their battered reputation, markets remain the best way of generating economic growth. But the market economy faces a crisis of legitimacy brought about by rising inequality and a breakdown of the relationship between risk and reward.
Closing the gap between rhetoric and reality is key to the euro's survival

Closing the gap between rhetoric and reality is key to the euro's survival

10 May 2010
Europe faces a critical choice between greater integration and disintegration. The gap between the rhetoric of a united and integrated Europe and the reality of national interests and politics has always dogged Europe.
The dangers of a disgruntled Germany

The dangers of a disgruntled Germany

Katinka Barysch
07 May 2010
Germany has finally agreed to help bail out Greece. The negotiations were acrimonious and took months. Angela Merkel’s hesitation and prevarication have increased the cost of the bail-out and unsettled financial markets.
Turning Japanese?

Turning Japanese?

30 April 2010
Japan has long had the highest level of public debt of any developed economy. The country’s public debt to GDP ratio is around 200 per cent of GDP, far in excess of even the EU’s worst performers.
Whatever happened to the G20?

Whatever happened to the G20?

Katinka Barysch
14 April 2010
George W Bush convened the first G20 summit in Washington in November 2008, at the height of the global financial and economic crisis. At two further summits in 2009, G20 leaders pledged to co-ordinate their economic stimulus packages (as well as exit strategies), avoid protectionism, address global imbalances, triple the resources of the IMF, and work out stricter rules for banks, hedge funds and other financial players.
There can be no eurozone stability without economic growth

There can be no eurozone stability without economic growth

01 April 2010
The German government believes that tougher fiscal rules are the solution to current strains in the eurozone. No doubt such rules are necessary. But they are not enough.
Germany

Why Christine Lagarde is right about Germany

Philip Whyte
26 March 2010
Greece’s recent fiscal travails have, slightly unexpectedly, thrown the spotlight on Germany’s current-account surplus. In mid-March, France’s finance minister, Christine Lagarde, urged Germany to do more to boost domestic demand – a call echoed by the European Commission’s president, José Manuel Barroso.
The Lisbon scorecard X: The road to 2020

The Lisbon scorecard X: The road to 2020

Simon Tilford, Philip Whyte
15 March 2010
The EU's Lisbon agenda has failed to deliver what it promised. Although most member-states have made some progress towards the targets they set themselves in 2000, their commitment to reform has been half-hearted.
It’s the economics, stupid

It’s the economics, stupid

26 February 2010
There was always a risk that a one-size-fits-all monetary policy would lead to big divergences in inflation and competitiveness across the eurozone. This, in turn, would result in trade imbalances which would be difficult to reverse.
How to build an EU energy market

How to build an EU energy market

Katinka Barysch
18 February 2010
Unbundling the supply of energy from its transport, moving Europe towards a low-carbon energy system, and getting the Nabucco pipeline built – these were the priorities of the last energy commissioner, Andris Piebalgs. His successor, Günther Oettinger, will write his own to-do list. The EU now has a dedicated climate change commissioner, Connie Hedegard, with whom Oettinger will have to work closely.
The new Commission's economic philosophy

The new Commission's economic philosophy

08 February 2010
The broad orientation of the Commission's economic policy is unlikely to change. It will continue to defend the single market, free trade and a tough competition policy.