Single market, competition & trade

In defence of Anglo-Saxon capitalism

In defence of Anglo-Saxon capitalism

29 September 2008
Those who never liked ‘Anglo-Saxon’ capitalism are feeling smug. Marxists, fans of ‘Rhineland’ capitalism and those who simply cannot stand American power are crowing.
Bulletin issue 62

Issue 62 - 2008

Charles Grant, Philip Whyte, Bobo Lo
26 September 2008
Farewell, Polish plumber

Farewell, Polish plumber

Philip Whyte
07 August 2008
When the EU expanded its membership in 2004, the UK was one of only three EU countries – Ireland and Sweden were the others – fully to open its borders to migrants from the ten new member states.
A new European mercantilism?

A new European mercantilism?

01 August 2008
Europe’s economic liberals have had a successful ten years. There have been protectionist pressures throughout this period, of course.
Should Europeans care about Doha?

Should Europeans care about Doha?

Katinka Barysch
30 July 2008
Are the Doha trade talks finally dead? Following the failure of the latest ministerial meeting in Geneva on July 29th, there will be little appetite for another big push to resolve disputes over farm subsidies and manufacturing tariffs.
Eurozone economic outlook

Eurozone economic outlook: Too much complacency

03 April 2008
A year ago the prospect of the dollar falling to 1.60 against the euro would have brought on cold sweats across Europe. Yet, here we are and there is no sense of crisis.
Liberal reforms are no threat to social Europe

Liberal reforms are no threat to social Europe

Philip Whyte
01 April 2008
Europeans have long sought to reconcile markets with social solidarity. The EU’s economic reform programme, the Lisbon agenda, falls squarely within this tradition. Launched in 2000, its vaulting ambition was to turn the EU into the “most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world by 2010”.
Bulletin issue 59

Issue 59 - 2008

Hugo Brady, Philip Whyte, Christoph Bertram
28 March 2008
A joint response to the credit crunch

A joint response to the credit crunch

Katinka Barysch
19 March 2008
Ailing banks are being rescued, markets remain frozen, economic numbers are becoming gloomier. Of course, central banks and governments are focusing on fire-fighting, on cutting interest rates, on providing cash to liquidity-starved banks and to consumers.
Time for the Export-Weltmeister to start consuming

Time for the Export-Weltmeister to start consuming

13 February 2008
Too many Europeans are blaming the US for the economic slowdown in Europe, as if everything would have been fine if only the Americans were not so irresponsible. This is complacent.
Lisbon scorecard VIII

The Lisbon scorecard VIII: Is Europe ready for an economic storm?

Simon Tilford, Katinka Barysch, Philip Whyte
01 February 2008
After more than half a decade of economic gloom, the years 2006 and 2007 restored some much-needed optimism to Europe. Faster GDP growth and falling unemployment were at least partly due to the implementation of structural reform.
Growing old gracefully

Growing old gracefully: How to ease population ageing in Europe

Alasdair Murray
17 January 2008
Europe stands on the cusp of a demographic revolution. Rising life expectancy and low fertility are radically transforming Europe’s demographic profile. Ageing populations pose profound political, economic and social challenges for Europe.
Politics, Sarkozy and the euro

Politics, Sarkozy and the euro

Philip Whyte
03 December 2007
Not long after its launch, the euro was famously dismissed by a disgruntled currency trader as a “toilet currency”. How things have changed. Since 2003, the euro’s external value has soared, particularly against the US dollar.
European retail banking

European retail banking: Will there ever be a single market?

David Shirreff
03 December 2007
Integrated markets for entertainment and communications, as well as nearly all goods, stretch from the Arctic to Cyprus. By contrast, Europe’s retail banking industry remains largely segmented along national lines.
China and the EU

China is losing its EU friends

Katinka Barysch
29 November 2007
The EU is getting tough on China. That, at least, is the impression one gets from high-ranking EU officials that arrived for the annual EU-China summit in Beijing this week. Economics is the main reason for Europe’s changing mood.
Can the EU learn to live with Chinese mercantilism? thumbnail

Can the EU learn to live with Chinese mercantilism?

Philip Whyte
29 October 2007
Not long after its launch, the euro was famously dismissed by a disgruntled currency trader as a “toilet currency”. How things have changed.
What should Europe do about sovereign wealth funds?

What should Europe do about sovereign wealth funds?

Katinka Barysch, Philip Whyte
01 October 2007
Several EU governments have become alarmed about sovereign wealth funds (SWFs). Germany, for example, is thinking of preventing such funds from buying local companies in sensitive sectors.