In the Press - Brexit: Haunted Europe

26 June 2016
Financial Times
"From now on, the narrative will be one of disintegration, not integration," says Charles Grant of the Centre for European Reform, a think-tank. "That doesn’t mean that the EU will fall apart, or even that another country will leave, which is highly unlikely in the foreseeable future. But the centrist politicians who run nearly every EU member-state will henceforth be on the defensive against the populist forces who oppose them and the EU."

In the Press - Parliament must decide what Brexit means in the interests of the whole Kingdom

26 June 2016
The Telegraph
"Whatever Juncker and a few federalist diehards in Brussels may think, most EU governments have woken up to the reality that the more Europe the push, the more euroscepticism they get," said Charles Grant from the Centre for European Reform. "The knee-jerk reaction of the Commission is always to try to seize on any crisis to try to push for more Europe and closer integration, but they can dream on this time," he said. 

In the Press - Brexit is a rejection of globalisation

26 June 2016
The Guardian
That dream is now over. As Charles Grant, the director of the Centre for European Reform think-tank put it: "Brexit is a momentous event in the history of Europe and from now on the narrative will be one of disintegration not integration."

In the Press - Fears that Spanish political crisis will deepen as country goes to the polls

25 June 2016
The Telegraph
“If we have a second election without a clear result, it will contribute to the existing sense of crisis in Europe,” Camino Mortera Martinez, a researcher from the Centre for European Reform, told the Telegraph. “Brexit is the worst crisis imaginable and now the EU needs strong states to deal with what’s coming up”.

In the Press - Why people who really wanted Brexit will regret it most

25 June 2016
The Washington Post
But perhaps the best evidence that people who voted for Brexit will come to regret it — if they haven't already — came via this report from the Centre for European Reform, a think-tank that favored Britain remaining in the EU By leaving, Britain is potentially also leaving its network of trade agreements within the region, pending negotiations. For areas that depend on exports for their economic sustenance, a less favorable trade agreements could deal a serious blow.

In the Press - Britain terminates failed marriage and heads for messy divorce

24 June 2016
EurActiv
“This idea is legally dubious. Article 50 was not employed for a departure of Greenland as it was not yet in the EU law book. But even if it had existed at that time, it would not be applicable to Greenland anyway, as it was not Denmark leaving the Community, but parts of its territories,” said Agata Gostyńska-Jakubowska of the Centre for European Reform and Adam Lazowski.

In the Press - What does Brexit mean for UK nationals living in Europe?

24 June 2016
The Week
In 2013, the Centre for European Reform warned that Spain could start charging Britons for their healthcare if the UK left the EU. A large number of the 319,000 expats living there are retired - and more Britons die in Spain than any other foreign country.

In the Press - Mogherini shakes up staff, mission

23 June 2016
Politico
"The EEAS is very much a tool that hasn't reached maturity yet," said Rem Korteweg, an EU foreign policy expert at the Centre for European Reform think-tank. "Its general direction still needs to be mapped out: Is it a 28-member ministry of foreign affairs? Or is it an entity coordinating ministries of foreign affairs in the 28 countries?"

In the Press - If you break it you own it

24 June 2016
Financial Times
In the most illuminating of the many quick reactions to the vote, the CER's John Springford rightly writes: "The best way to manage the economic risks would be for the EU to make a quick offer for the UK to join the European Economic Area" - know as the "Norway option".

In the Press - El futuro de la UE queda tocado por el referéndum británico

24 June 2016
El Espanol
"Aunque este referéndum sólo afecta a Reino Unido, el sentimiento de crítica a la UE lo comparten tantos países en estos momentos que es muy arriesgando culpar únicamente a la pérfida Albion", dice a este periódico el analista del Centre for European Reform, Rem Korteweg.